Out of the mouth of babes…

 We had a very enjoyable time around the breakfast table on Wednesday morning. My flatmate and I are two bachelors, but our flat is the basement of a rather large family house and each Wednesday morning we all come together for “House Breakfast”. It’s a rather lovely break in the week and is a refreshing reminder of what ‘real life’ is like, where there are children and marriage relationships and other such crazy, normal things.

Anyway, this Wednesday we were all sitting there happily eating our breakfast. Ed and I were discussing the week ahead with Charlie and Claire while their two boys, Tom (who’s four), and Edward (who’s six) listened patiently. All of a sudden, the verbal restraint got a bit much for Tom and he blurted out the immortal words, “Listening to Mummy is listening to God.”

We all laughed hard for a good few minutes before happily educating Tom on the doctrine of revelation and the fact that nowadays God speaks through Scripture, not straight through Claire.

I am very grateful to God for these sorts of times where you do just have a good laugh. How gracious he is that he gives us such fun things to enjoy even though we do not deserve them in the slightest.

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What’s in a name?

So why Leevingmyworld?

I hate choosing names for things. No matter how hard you think you always get home and think of ten reasons why you chose the worst name possible. Still, you have to choose something and Leevingmyworld made sense for two reasons.

One, ‘Leaving my world’ is a phrase which encapsulates some of the core truths which I’ve been learning this year. The idea of a ‘worldview’ has greatly helped me in my struggles with skepticism. There are different ways of looking at the world. You can look at the world with an atheistic worldview, a buddhist worldview, a Christian worldview, or any other ideology that you care to mention. An atheist looks at the world and see’s everything as reducible to atoms, molecules and the laws of nature which govern their movements. In the atheistic world view (at least in those of the ‘new atheists’), questions such as ‘Why am I here?’ and ‘What lies beyond death?’ have no relevance, ‘DNA neither knows nor cares. DNA just is and we dance to it’s music.’ Richard Dawkins , River out of eden , p.133.

More importantly even than which questions you think are relevant, your worldview even affects your epistemology, how you discover what’s true. In pre-modern times (think medieaval ages, monks painstakingly writing ornate letters on fat paper) there was the notion that the basis for everything we know is God. Descartes flipped that one on its head and said that the starting point for all knowledge is ourselves. Then we hit post-modernism and certainty about anything was thrown right out the window.

As a mathematician (of sorts, undergrad), I care very much whether what I believe is true. There is no point in believing anything if it is in fact nothing but a figment of your imagination. At University my life was regularly blighted with the question, ‘How do I know anything is true, let alone Christianity?’ There was a significant shift in my thinking when I realised that your worldview tells you which questions are worth asking. In the Christian worldview, there ain’t no point asking ‘How can I know if anything is true?’. God exists and is a rational being. He gave us rational brains, like his, to rule the world under him (Gen 1-2). God very much wants to know that our world is real and that he is real. There is no need to be troubled by the question ‘How can I know if anything is true?’.

So, this year has been the beginning of a new adventure. I have begun the journey of leaving behind my old non-Christian worldview and letting my mind be increasingly shaped by the worldview revealed in the Bible. I hope that this blog will be somewhere to chart the challenges that I find in the Bible as well as anything else which crops up along the way.

Two, I wanted something of my history and background in the title. It may not be a part of my personal experience, but my grandmother is Chinese by birth and her maiden name was Lee, hence the ‘leeving’.

I confess that my main aim is to force myself to do some, or any, writing. Having done nothing but Maths and drumming for 5 years my ability to construct a reasoned argument is rather lacking.’What’s in a name? that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.’ I may not be penning Shakespeare anytime soon, but hopefully my writing will improve and who knows, maybe I’ll even say something useful along the way.